The virtual reality tour is part of the Salem Museum’s exhibit that ties in with Dr. Lynn Rainville’s Nov. 19 talk on the crucial roles Virginians played in the Great War. After Rainville, who is the dean of Sweet Briar College and an anthropologist, studied American cemeteries in France from World War I and II, she began looking for World War I and II memorials in Virginia. She located more than 350. And she found them in surprising places: from plaques to statues to memorial gymnasiums, she explained. “One of the most unusual was underground in Luray Caverns,” she said. In Winchester, a bronze medallion in front of trees carries the names of the dead. “A lot of Virginia’s moving efforts were to remind individuals of a catastrophic world war,” she continued.

More than 70,000 men were drafted in Virginia, Rainville said, from May 1917 until the Armistice was signed.” In Salem, many are familiar with the German 77 mm fi eld gun on Boulevard with a plaque with names of World War I dead, which is one of the state’s “car magnets.” Th e placement of similar guns and memorials on streets seems to attract accidents, Rainville said during her…



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